The Third World Squat - Improve your mobility for sport and everyday life.


  
The "Third World Squat" is a term gaining attention throughout the athletic community. It refers to remaining stationary in a deep squatted position for extended periods of time.
 It's name comes from the observation, that when travelling through less economically developed countries, it's not uncommon to see lots of people sitting in this position during many activities from preparing food to playing cards. 
We are born with the ability to perform this movement, but are often unable to due to a lifetime of sitting on chairs.  This leads to tightness in the spine, hip & ankles.

How to do it

It sounds easy! But here are some critical technique tips 

Your Spine must remain straight & elongated
Your Knees must rise above your hip crease
Your Feet must be at least shoulder width apart
Your Heels must remain on the ground


What are the benefits?


Third World Squatting is being described as the single most valuable tool in unlocking athletic performance but its benefits do not stop there. Maintaining this position for prolonged periods of time: 

Improves flexibility, mobility & posture
Improves core strength 
Improves digestion
Promotes circulation throughout the body
& My personal favourite reduces the likelihood of Injury!


How to get started

It's as simple as squatting as low as you can with your heels on the ground for a few minutes per day. If you find you fall backwards, grab something sturdy to support your weight as you descend. As your flexibility increases, you'll be able to reach the full depth with ease. Once here, you can start to perform simple tasks in this position, like replying to texts or reading a book. That's when you'll get the full benefits listed above. 

 

What not to do...

Do not lift the heels when squatting

         

 

Maintain good upright back posture, don't curl or hunch your back

 


Please be aware that this exercise is not suitable for someone with a current injury unless advised by your practitioner.

Leave a comment

Name

Email address (never shown)

Comment